A response to the prevalent campus hook-up culture

Here is an interesting development at Catholic University of America, noted in the Washington Times recently. This Fall, CUA will institute single-sex dorms in an attempt to foster a more wholesome environment for meaningful relations between the sexes: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/jun/17/single-sex-dorms-right-for-catholic-university/#.Tfz7CIq2pBA;email. Certainly, this is far preferable to the current alchohol-drenched milieu which prevails on too many campuses. The current environment inures our youth to promiscuity while diminishing their innate aspiration for life-long commitment, while, of course, all the time relying on abortion as the fail-safe solution to the babies who at times arise from these fleeting unions.

Thomas Cavanaugh

Thomas A. Cavanaugh is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of San Francisco, where he has taught since 1994. His scholarship includes Double-effect Reasoning: Doing Good and Avoiding Evil (Clarendon: Oxford, 2006) as well as articles in medical, ethical and philosophical journals such as: Bioethics, Science and Engineering Ethics, Christian Bioethics, Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, Journal of Applied Philosophy, Journal of General Internal Medicine, American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly, The Thomist, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, and Aquinas Review. He regularly teaches medical ethics at USF. He lectures nationally and internationally on Bio-ethics, ethics, and the Catholic Intellectual Tradition at institutions such as: Stanford, La Sapienza, Berkeley, The University of Buenos Aires, Marquette, Baylor, Brigham Young, The New University of Lisbon, and Nihon University of Tokyo. He has previously chaired USF’s Philosophy Department; currently, he serves as its Ethics Coordinator. Amongst other honors, he has been awarded and held: the Bradley Fellowship, the Richard M. Weaver Fellowship, the National Endowment for the Humanities Chair, the Mortimer Fleishhacker Chair, and the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice Humanities Research Fellowship. He received the doctorate in Philosophy from the University of Notre Dame, writing under Ralph McInerny. He received the A.B. from Thomas Aquinas College.