Why abortion is still the most important political issue

UFL member, O. Carter Snead (Notre Dame), has a terrific new article on the Public Discourse blog, Protect the Weak and Vulnerable: The Primacy of the Life Issue. In the article, he first establishes that the debates over abortion and embryo destructive research are really about membership in the human family and the reach of the American promise of “liberty and justice for all.” He compares the records of Presidents George W. Bush and Barak H. Obama on the protection of the unborn and identifies actions the next president can take to advance legal protection for all Americans, including the tiniest and most vulnerable of us.

No doubt after reading this essay some will still disagree with those of us who believe that the life issue is the single most important political issue of our day, but it won’t be for lack of a clear explanation of our position.

Teresa Collett

Teresa Stanton Collett is a professor at the University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis, Minnesota, where she teaches bioethics, property law, and constitutional law. A nationally prominent speaker and scholar, she is active in attempts to rebuild the Culture of Life and protect the institutions of marriage and family. She often represents groups of state legislators, the Catholic Medical Association, and the Christian Medical and Dental Association in appellate case related to medical-legal matters. She represented the governors of Minnesota and North Dakota before the U.S. Supreme Court as amici curiae regarding the effectiveness of those states’ parental involvement laws. She has served as special attorney general for Oklahoma and Kansas related to legislation designed to protect the well-being of minors and unborn children. She is an elected member of the American Law Institute and has testified before committees of the U.S. House of Representatives and U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittees on the Constitution, as well as numerous legislative committees in the states.