Announcement of 2015 UFL Essay Contest Winners

The University Faculty for Life Scholarly Achievement Award in Creative Writing, Literary Criticism, or Research has encouraged students since 2004 to submit their best work for the cause of life.  This year’s entries continue to challenge contest judges with high quality submissions.  The eight essays received in the Creative Writing and Research categories total 33,180 words, 282 footnotes, and 63 bibliographic entries—an impressive increase in the quantity of materials that judges evaluated for 2015.

As in previous years, the quality of this year’s entries made the selection challenging.  The judges greatly appreciate that you, the faculty, took time from your busy schedules to promote the contest and to encourage your students to submit their best work.  Thank you!

Recognizing the quality of students’ research efforts, the judges are proud to announce that there are seven honorable mentions for this year’s contest.  As you will see, the range of topics submitted is impressive.  In the Creative Writing category, the honorable mentions are:

  • Elizabeth Mitchell, a student at the University of Kansas Medical Center, for her essay “Generation Y: A Comment on Abortion Versus The Millennials”

and

  • Anton Sorkin, a student at Emory University School of Law, for his essay “A Trial of  Strength: Scenes of Violence; Building a Case for the Right of a Willing Father to His Unborn Child”

In the Research category, the honorable mentions are:

  • Anna Capizzi, a graduate student in the moral theology program at Seton Hall University, for her essay “Human Trafficking as a Moral Evil in History and Today”
  • Sharon M. Gutkowski, a graduate student at Seton Hall University, for her essay “The Catholic Analysis of the Moral Absolute Against Abortion”
  • Andrew S. Kubick, a student in the post-master’s certificate program, concentrating in bioethics, at Holy Apostles College and Seminary, for his essay “Marriage and a Culture of Life”
  • Miriam McKee, a student at Loras College, for her essay “Connecting Kingdom of Heaven Parables to the Morality of Capital Punishment”

and

  • Katie Tipton, a student at Patrick Henry College, for her essay “Will We Survive Our Technology? A Study of The Singularity in Light of the Doctrine of Personhood”

And finally, the first place winner of this year’s University Faculty for Life Scholarly Achievement Award in the Research category is

  • Meaghan Frawley, a mechanical engineering student at the University of Notre Dame, for her essay “On the Nature of the Fetus”

The University Faculty for Life Essay Contest is a significant way that pro-life students can be challenged to write mellifluous creative writing or research work, to build their publication portfolios, to be recognized by pro-life academics for their work, and, most importantly, to exercise their talents to advance the cause of life in the academic environment.  This year’s entries continue to demonstrate that students are willing to use their talents for life-affirming purposes with encouragement from you, their faculty.  May next year’s contest inspire students to submit even more challenging work!

 

Additional pictures from 2015 UFL Conference

 

 

 

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Life and Learning XXV

The twenty-fifth annual University Faculty for Life Life and Learning Conference is under way at the University of St. Thomas Law School in Minneapolis. In the next few days I will be posting summaries of some of the talks. In the mean time here are some photos.

Dean Robert K. Vischer of the UST Law School welcomes the participants.

Dean Robert K. Vischer of the UST Law School welcomes the participants.

Melissa Moschella of Catholic University of America presents the plenary session on a child-centered approach to the issues surrounding reproductive technologies.

Melissa Moschella of Catholic University of America presents the plenary session on a child-centered approach to the issues surrounding reproductive technologies.

Richard Stith of Valparaiso  explores ways to overcome the imaginative barriers to embryonic personhood.

Richard Stith of Valparaiso explores ways to overcome the imaginative barriers to embryonic personhood.

John Goerke of the University of St. Thomas talks about Edith Stein, surrogacy and motherhood

John Goerke of the University of St. Thomas talks about Edith Stein, surrogacy and motherhood

David Mall waiting for the first break-out session to begin.

David Mall waiting for the first break-out session to begin.

Post-talk conversation at the reception.

Post-talk conversation at the reception.

Post-talk conversation at the reception.

Post-talk conversation at the reception.

Time article on premature viability study

Time Magazine ran an article discussing the possible impact of a study in the New England Journal of Medicine on the viability of premature babies which showed that a small percentage of babies born at 22 weeks could survive if given the proper treatment.”How a New Study on Premature Babies Could Influence the Abortion Debate,” by Eliza Gray.

HT Prolife Center at the University of St. Thomas (MN.).

Teresa Collett on Ecuador abortion legalization battle

UFL President Teresa Collett was quoted in a LifeNews.com article, “Human Rights Watch Pressures Ecuador to Legalize Abortion, Pro-Life Nation Fights Back.” In it she responds to the Human Life Watch assertion that abortion restriction laws are “cruel” and “degrading” to women.

The legal claim is absolutely false, say international legal experts like Professor Teresa Collett of the University of St. Thomas. Collett said the demand made by HRW to Dr. Mauro Andino of Ecuador’s Justice commission has “no basis” in law. The pressure to “legalize abortion in a broad range of cases has no basis” in UN treaties or any other legally binding convention to which Ecuador belongs, she said.

 

2015 Life and Learning Program

Here is a sneak preview of the 2015 Life and Learning UFL Conference program to be held at St. Thomas Law School in Minneapolis May 29-30. For more information and to register for the Conference, go to the UFL web page here.

Conference Program

25th Annual Conference

1991-2015

Life & Learning XXIV

May 29 – 30, 2015

Hosted by

University of St. Thomas School of Law

Minneapolis, MN

Friday, May 29th

12:00 – 2:00pm          Conference Registration

12:00 – 5:00pm          Refreshments

2:00 – 2:15pm              Conference Opening and Welcome

Teresa Collett, UFL President and Conference Host

2:30 – 4:00pm             Panel Session I

  • A
    • “Countering Some Popular Arguments for Euthanasia”, Catherine Deavel (University of St. Thomas)
    • “Addressing the Issues of Abortion and Euthanasia in the Fundamentals of Nursing: Utilizing the Theory of Moral Distress.”, Elizabeth Sutton MSN, RN (Queensborough Community College)”
    • “Compassion and Assisted Suicide”, Mary Rose Lemmons (University of St. Thomas)
  • B
    • “The Telos of the Child”, Deborah Savage, Ph.D.( St. Paul Seminary School of Divinity)
    • “Overcoming the Imaginative Barrier to Embryonic Personhood”, Richard Stith (Valparaiso University Law School)
    • “The Authentic Identity of Motherhood: Surrogacy and the Nature of Woman”, John Goerke (Student, University of St. Thomas)

4:15-5:15 pm     Plenary Address I – Melissa Moschella

5:30 –7:15 pm              Dinner – McGinley Center Ballroom

Saturday, May 30th

8:00 – 9:00 am          Mass

8:15 – 9:15 am             Continental Breakfast

9:30 – 11:00 am         Panel Session II

  • A
    • “Why the Right to Elective Abortion Fails Casey’s Own Interest-Balancing Methodology – and Why It Matters”, Steve Gilles (Quinnipiac University School of Law)
    • “A Draft Opinion Overruling Roe v. Wade”, Clarke Forsythe (Americans United for Life)
    • “PPACA (Obamacare) and Abortion”, Lynn Wardle (J. Reuben Clark Law School, Brigham Young University)
  • B
    • “Suicide, Shakespeare and Sloth”, Bernadette Waterman Ward (University of Dallas)
    • “Evangelical and Catholic Vampire Hunters Together”, David Deavel (University of St. Thomas)
    • “Abortion Distortion: Correcting Literary Criticism’s Misreading of Early Twentieth- Century Abortion Fiction”, Jeff Koloze (Lorain County Community College) – delivered by David Mall

11:15 – 12:30pm        Lunch 

1:00 – 2:00 pm         Plenary Address II  –  Daniel Gannon

2:15 – 3:15 pm           Panel Session III

  • A
    • “Walker – McGill v. Stuart Before the U.S. Supreme Court: Ultrasounds as Ordinary Informed Consent”, Morse Tan (Northern Illinois University College of Law)
    • “Significant Restrictions on Abortions at 8 Weeks is Consistent with Legal Principles of Roe”, Michael Degnan (University of St. Thomas)
    • “Rape, Acute Stress, and Pregnancy: Was Jack Willke Right?”, Richard Fehring (Marquette University)
  • B
    • “Abortion and the Argument from Uncertainty”, Mathew Lu (University of St. Thomas)
    • “Historical Reenactments: A Key Pro-life Argument”, Charles Bellinger (Brite Divinity School)
    • “The Problem with Polling Millennials on Abortion”, Tina Whittington (Students for Life of America)

3:30 – 4:30 pm           Panel Session IV

  • A
    • “Economies of Co-Operation: An Alternative to Capitalism, Collectivism, and the Culture of Death”,  Eric Manchester (St. Charles Borromeo Seminary)
    • “Creating a Culture of Pro-Life Virtue: Persistent Acts of Mercy, Not Random Acts of Kindness”, Heidi Giebel (University of St. Thomas)
    • Barbara Freres
  • B
    • “Actions of the UN Secretary General regarding conflict –related rape”, Teresa Collett (University of St. Thomas School of Law)
    • “A Critique of Carter v. Canada”, Richard Myers (Ave Maria School of Law)

4:30 – 5:00 pm       Open Microphone –

5:30  pm                   Catholic Vigil Mass –

6:30 – 8:30pm       Closing Banquet –

                                    UFL Writing Contest Award Presentation                           

8:30 – 10:30pm    Hospitality Suite-